filosofía

Sifu, or the invisible commitment


No hay comentarios

The term sifu, which is traditionally referred to as the teacher or kungfu teacher, can be roughly translated as “father of practice”. Likewise, all the terminology used to refer to the classmates, students, teacher of the teacher himself, derives from that used to designate the members of the family. As we have already seen, Confucianism articulates the social environment in which Wing Chun is learned and practiced, and for Confucianism, the family is the nucleus and model from which all other social relations are built in traditional Chinese society .

These relations, according to Confucianism, revolve around the orders of hierarchy and the duty of obedience to your superior. Although it is true that Confucius defended that for obedience to be forced the superior should act correctly. As he expressed: “fu fu, zi zi”, that is to say when the father acts as father, the son acts as a son. But the truth is that in practice these relationships often do not work as much as a consequence of the superior’s doing well (whether father, politician, boss, martial arts teacher) or social pressure that allows even despotic positions from the upper step towards The lower one without it being able to do anything to remedy the situation.

My affinity for daoism and my rejection of much of Confucian ideology is clear. That is why my way of understanding someone’s sifu role may be something different. In fact when I started teaching I had serious doubts about promoting or encouraging my students to call me sifu. However, one day I realized that the moment someone sincerely considers your sifu to create a bond, an invisible commitment. I dare to think that in the great majority of cases the instructors understand that the link has been created from the student to the teacher: he must take it as a reference, respect him and even obey him. I do not insinuate that I do not claim respect for myself from my students, but as the claim to any other person with whom I relate. What happens is that in my view the duty, the obligation, the bond, is created from me to my student. When someone calls me sifu, and although he is not conscious, in my interior I sign a contract with myself. That person, who pays his fee every month, is waiting for me not only to do my work with total dedication, with absolute dedication to his improvement as a martial artist, but also as a transmitter of a wealth that goes beyond physical technique. I live the Wing Chun 24 hours a day, for me (although it sounds like topic) Wing Chun is not only practiced, it ends up living. Progress in the system as you progress as an individual, as a person. And when someone refers to me as sifu is obliging me, since I freely agree to be considered as such, to be your guide and companion in that process, last the time that lasts. My position before him is not superior, on the contrary, in our relationship he is the first.

As the Daodejing says: the wise man is placed last, and the same we can say of the good sifu.

[give_form id=”467″]

sifu ip man

 

filosofía

Sifu, o el compromiso invisible.


No hay comentarios

El término sifu, con el que se designa tradicionalmente al profesor o maestro de kungfu, puede traducirse aproximadamente como “padre de práctica”. Igualmente toda la terminología utilizada para referirse a los compañeros, alumnos, maestro del propio maestro, deriva de aquella utiliza para designar a los miembros de la familia. Y es que como ya vimos, el confucionismo articula el entorno social en que se aprende y practica el Wing Chun y para el confucianismo la familia es el núcleo y modelo a partir del cual se construye todo el resto de relaciones sociales en la sociedad china tradicional.

Estas relaciones, según el confucianismo, giran en torno a los órdenes de jerarquía y al deber de obediencia a tu superior. Aunque es cierto que Confucio defendía que para que la obediencia fuera obligada el superior debía actuar correctamente. Tal como expresaba: “ fu fu, zi zi”, es decir cuando el padre hace de padre, el hijo hace de hijo. Pero lo cierto es que en la práctica en muchas ocasiones estas relaciones no funcionan tanto como consecuencia del buen hacer del superior (sea padre, político, jefe, maestro de artes marciales) sino por la presión social que permite incluso posiciones despóticas del escalón superior hacia el inferior sin que éste pueda hacer nada para remediar la situación.

Queda clara mi afinidad por el daoismo y mi rechazo de gran parte de la ideología confuciana. Es por esto que mi manera de entender el rol de ser sifu de alguien puede ser algo diferente. De hecho cuando empecé a impartir clases tuve serias dudas de promover o animar a mis alumnos a denominarme sifu. Sin embargo, un día comprendí que en el momento en que alguien te considera, sinceramente, su sifu se crea un vínculo, un compromiso invisible. Me atrevo a pensar que en la gran mayoría de casos los instructores entienden que el vínculo se ha creado del alumno hacia el maestro: deberá tomarlo como referencia, respetarle y hasta obedecerlo. No insinúo que no reclame respeto hacia mi por parte de mis alumnos, pero como la reclamo a cualquier otra persona con la que me relaciono. Lo que sucede es que bajo mi punto de vista el deber, la obligación, el vínculo, se crea de mi hacia mi alumno. Cuando alguien me llama sifu, y aunque él no sea consciente, en mi interior firmo un contrato conmigo mismo. Esa persona, que paga su cuota cada mes, está esperando de mi no solamente que haga mi trabajo con entrega total, con dedicación absoluta a su mejora como artista marcial, sino también como transmisor de una riqueza que va más allá de la técnica física. Yo vivo el Wing Chun 24 horas al día, para mi (aunque suene a tópico) el Wing Chun no solamente se practica, se acaba viviendo. Progresas en el sistema a la vez que progresas como individuo, como persona. Y cuando alguien se refiere a mi como sifu me está obligando, puesto que yo acepto libremente ser considerado como tal, a ser su guía y compañero en ese proceso, dure el tiempo que dure. Mi posición ante él no es de superioridad, al contrario, en nuestra relación él está el primero.

Tal como dice el Daodejing: el hombre sabio se coloca en último lugar, y lo mismo podemos decir del buen sifu.

[give_form id=”470″]

sifu ip man

chi sao

The importance of stepping in chi sao


No hay comentarios

It is possible to say that there are two great tendencies in the practice of chi sao: one in which the focus is mainly on the use of the hands and is developed mainly static, and one in which the use of the displacements.
Although training chi is without displacements, or almost without them, can be useful in an initial phase of the learning, the fact is that to maintain this modality as main carries important dangers in being effective in the combat. In fact, once the steps in the chi are mastered, all (or practically all) techniques should be done with displacement.

The initial distance between practitioners during chi is a distance too long for a stroke thrown from it to be effective. For a blow to produce the shock necessary to achieve a k.o. it must produce a jolt, going through the opponent’s body. It is for that reason that to hit at a realistic distance in which, if we wished, we could cause real damage to the adversary we must advance towards him. So to strike correctly from the starting point we must take a step with the attack.
On the other hand when defending the attack of the adversary, although sometimes we can stop the adversary without going back, the truth is that if we get used to using only our arms as a defensive tool we run several dangers. On the one hand we use only one defensive resource, while if the defense is accompanied by a displacement and our hands fail we will have more possibilities to avoid the attack of the adversary. On the other hand and although we do not fail, if the opponent launches an attack with a large displacement, even if we avoid the blow with the use of the hands without moving, it is possible that we stay so close to the body of the attacker that our own movements are hampered by lack of space. Obviously the opposite error that we must avoid is to move too far and leave the minimum distance of chi sao, moving away more than necessary.
Finally the use of steps in chi sao, both to attack and to defend, allows us to work the angles. We always strive to ensure that our anatomical center line (the one that divides the body into two symmetrical halves) coincides with the real central line (the plane that joins our spine with that of the adversary), and that is not so for our adversary. This gives us an advantage over it, and can not be achieved without working the techniques with steps in the chi sao. Equally learning to avoid being dominated in the central line is also something that we achieve by training the chi with steps.

In short: training chi sao techniques without movement can be an appropriate initial (although not necessary) phase for the beginner. Training chi sao with great use of steps gives us a more useful practice to develop effective skills in real combat.

[give_form id=”467″]

*Video is in spanish

 

chi sao

La importancia de los pasos en el chi sao


No hay comentarios

Se puede decir que hay dos grandes tendencias a la hora de practicar chi sao: aquella en la que el enfoque se pone principalmente en el uso de las manos y se desarrolla de forma principalmente estática, y aquella en la que se enfatiza el uso de los desplazamientos.
Aunque entrenar chi sao sin desplazamientos, o casi sin ellos, puede ser útil en una fase inicial del aprendizaje, lo cierto es que mantener esta modalidad como principal conlleva importantes peligros a la hora de ser eficaces en el combate. De hecho, una vez dominados los pasos en el chi sao, todas las técnicas (o prácticamente todas) deberían realizarse con desplazamiento.

chi sao

La distancia inicial entre los practicantes durante el chi sao es una distancia demasiado larga como para que un golpe lanzado desde ella fuera eficaz. Para que un golpe produzca la conmoción necesaria para lograr un k.o. éste debe producir una sacudida, al “atravesar” el golpe el cuerpo del adversario. Es por ello que para trabajar a una distancia realista en la que, si lo deseáramos, pudiéramos causar verdadero daño al adversario debemos avanzar hacia él. Es decir que para golpear de forma correcta desde el punto inicial debemos dar un paso con el ataque.
Por otro lado a la hora de defender el ataque del adversario, aunque en ocasiones podamos detener al adversario sin retroceder, lo cierto es que si nos acostumbrarnos a utilizar solamente nuestros brazos como herramienta defensiva corremos varios peligros. Por un lado usamos solamente un recurso defensivo, mientras que si la defensa viene acompañada de un desplazamiento y nuestras manos fallan tendremos más posibilidades de evitar el ataque del adversario. Por otro lado y aunque no fallemos, si el adversario lanza un ataque con un gran desplazamiento, aunque evitemos el golpe con el uso de las manos sin desplazarnos es posible que nos quedemos tan cerca del cuerpo del atacante que nuestros propios movimientos se vean dificultados por falta de espacio. Evidentemente el error contrario que debemos evitar es desplazarnos demasiado y salir de la distancia mínima de chi sao, alejándonos más de lo necesario.
Por último el uso de pasos en el chi sao, tanto para atacar como para defender, nos permite trabajar los ángulos. Buscamos siempre conseguir que nuestra línea central anatómica (la que divide el cuerpo en dos mitades simétricas) coincida con la línea central real (el plano que une nuestra columna vertebral con la del adversario), pero que no sea así para nuestro adversario. Esto nos da una ventaja sobre él, y no puede lograrse sin trabajar las técnicas con pasos en el chi sao. Igualmente aprender a evitar que nos ganen la línea central también es algo que logramos al entrenar el chi sao con pasos.

En definitiva: entrenar las técnicas de chi sao sin desplazamientos puede ser una fase inicial adecuada (aunque no necesaria) para el principiante. Entrenar un chi sao con gran uso de pasos nos otorga una práctica más útil para desarrollar habilidades eficaces en combates reales.

[give_form id=”470″]

 

 

 

 

filosofía, kuen kuit

The punch comes from the heart


No hay comentarios

One of the wing chun kuen kuit (or wing chun aphorisms) says that the fist comes from the heart (Kuen Yao Sum Faat). This statement has several readings, some more literal and others more metaphorical, but just as valid.
The fist comes from the heart because both during the practice of the form and the actual application, the fist is launched from the center of the chest, where we intuitively place the heart.
In traditional Chinese culture the heart is the seat of mind and conscious intention. So another interpretation of this aphorism is that the act of throwing the fist is more a consequence of an intention directed by the mind than an act of brute force. This interpretation lends itself to a reading that comes close to quasi-esoteric points of view that I do not share. I think that to speak of qi or hei in Cantonese, as of an invisible and mystical force that guides our movements, only distances us from martial efficacy. The Jing or relaxed force is a very real concept and it allows our strokes to be of great power, but there is nothing mysterious about it. When we say that the fist comes from the heart, from the intention, we must understand that the movement must be performed as relaxed as possible. When we say that we do not use force, we must understand that what we do not use is the strength of the muscles we do not need. Throwing a fist with a strained arm only slows us down and therefore rest power: the resistance of the biceps tension must be overcome by the triceps to stretch the arm. The relaxed force is achieved using only the muscles needed to make the desired movement.

IMG_20170704_182316
Finally, for me the fist is born from the heart because the path of the Wing Chun is after all an inner path. Beware, I do not want to deny the first and most obvious utility of Wing Chun: fighting, martial art, self-defense. But without denying this reality I want to point to a deeper one, the one that slowly but inexorably changes you. The fist comes out of the heart, and with each fist the heart is transformed, our character is molded: that with a weak mood is strengthened a little, and the one dominated by anger is appeased. The central line that we look for in the outside is also created in the interior, a center that is balance between opposites without getting to annul them, but that is able to transit between the soft and the hard when it is necessary. Each year of practice leaves a mark on our interior, like the rings of trees that denote their age, so our interior matures with practice.
The fist is born from the heart, and from the fist is born a little more noble heart.

[give_form id=”467″]

filosofía, kuen kuit

El puño viene del corazón


No hay comentarios

Uno de los wing chun kuen kuit (o aforismos del wing chun) dice que el puño viene del corazón (Kuen Yao Sum Faat). Esta afirmación tiene diversas lecturas, algunas más literales y otras más metafóricas, pero igual de válidas.

El puño viene del corazón porqué tanto durante la práctica de la forma como en la aplicación real, el puño se lanza desde el centro del pecho, donde intuitivamente situamos el corazón.

En la cultura tradicional china el corazón es la sede de la mente y de la intención consciente. Así que otra interpretación de este aforismo es que el acto de lanzar el puño es más consecuencia de una intención dirigida por la mente que no un acto de fuerza bruta. Esta interpretación se presta a una lectura que se acerca a puntos de vista cuasi esotéricos que no comparto. Creo que hablar de qi o hei en cantonés, como de una fuerza invisible y mística que guía nuestros movimientos, no hace sino que alejarnos de la eficacia marcial. El Jing o fuerza relajada es un concepto muy real y que permite que nuestros golpes sean de gran potencia, pero no tiene nada de misterioso. Cuando decimos que el puño nace del corazón, de la intención debemos entender que el movimiento debe realizarse de forma lo más relajada posible. Cuando se dice que no usamos la fuerza, hay que entender que lo que no usamos es la fuerza de los músculos que no necesitamos. Lanzar un puño con el brazo tenso no hace sino que restarnos velocidad y por tanto fuerza: la resistencia de la tensión del bíceps deberá ser vencida por el tríceps para estirar el brazo. La fuerza relajada se consigue utilizando solamente los músculos necesarios para realizar el movimiento deseado.

IMG_20170704_182316

Por último, para mí el puño nace del corazón porqué el camino del Wing Chun es al fin y al cabo un camino interior. Cuidado, no quiero con ello negar la utilidad primera y más evidente del Wing Chun: la lucha, el arte marcial, la defensa personal. Pero sin negar esta realidad quiero apuntar a otra más profunda, aquella que te va transformando lentamente, muy lentamente, pero de forma inexorable. El puño sale del corazón, y con cada puño el corazón se va transformando, nuestro carácter se va moldeando: el débil de ánimo se fortalece un poco, y aquel dominado por la ira se va apaciguando otro tanto. La línea central que buscamos en el exterior se va creando también en el interior, un centro que es equilibrio entre opuestos sin llegar a anularlos, si no que es capaz de transitar entre lo suave y lo duro cuando es necesario. Cada año de práctica deja una marca en nuestro interior, como las anillas de los árboles que denotan su edad, así nuestro interior va madurando con el tiempo de práctica.

El puño nace del corazón, y del puño nace un corazón un poco más noble.

[give_form id=”470″]