vídeos

Vídeo promocional MM Wing Chun 2017


No Comments

Empezamos la temporada de Wing Chun del curso 2017-2018 con un nuevo vídeo de presentación de nuestra escuela, en el que se puede apreciar un poco todo el entrenamiento que realizamos en nuestra escuela de MM Wing Chun Granollers. 

Trabajo de formas, técnicas de golpeo, aplicaciones defensivas, chi sao y combate. Esperamos que os guste y os animéis a entrenar y aprender este sofisticado arte marcial. 

General

The Importance of combat training in Wing Chun Kuen


No Comments

The truth is that many would end this title with a “is irrelevant.” From my point of view, including combat practices in Wing Chun training is very interesting and essential if we want what we are practicing to be effective.
Let’s look at some of the arguments against its practice:
– The duel combat type is unreal since in a real situation of personal defense it develops in a very different way as it does in a ring.
Although I do not deny that it is true that sparring is not entirely realistic, it must be admitted that chi sao is not at all and yet it is a cornerstone in Wing Chun. So that the combat is not 100% realistic does not mean that it can not be useful.
-In traditional training there is no combat practice.
This is not true as Wing Chun practitioners sought other styles fighters to challenge. The problem is that today if the combat is not practiced in the classroom many students can spend months and years without the opportunity to practice it.
-The practice of chi sao and the training of techniques is enough.
In front of an adversary who does not occupy the center line, for example, the chi sao loses much of its usefulness. And in front of an opponent who will defend and counterattack, the programmed training of the technique is not enough.

For these reasons, I do not think the argument is that the combat should not be part of Wing Chun training. Its benefits are multiple, because although a duel is not exactly the same as a real situation the truth is that in it we can receive the attack from a long distance, in a lateral position, while walking etc. Situations that occur during combat. So, knowing your limits, incorporating its practice will be useful.

wing chun

Of course, we must know how to train combat to be consistent with our system. Although the following is nothing more than a personal proposition, it may be of interest to many practitioners. The first thing to keep in mind is that the approach to combat must be progressive. In my school after a month of practice, the first step is to respond from a static guard to an attack of any kind and random. At three months we incorporated the combinations of two attacks. At four or five months we maintain the static waiting and stimulation of our partner’s combinations but now waiting without guard. Unguarded response training is important as far as the personal defense perspective is concerned. Obviously in a situation of danger we must always keep the distance and hands up but sometimes there is no warning prior to the aggression. Although in these cases responding becomes difficult, training in this way improves our chances of success. Simultaneously, this is after four or five months, we properly incorporate combat or sparring. In this case one of the two practitioners will use his Wing Chun while the partner will use any type of technique, whether or not of our style. In fact we emphasize the use of the circular line since in other styles it is usually used as much or more than the straight line. During the sparring it is also interesting that the partner tries to fight from a distance greater than the one we want in Wing Chun and to change the position with respect to us so that we are forced to work the mobility. It is also important not to be collaborative with us (we are talking about combat) but also not to exceed if it is technically superior so that we can progressively improve.
In my school when the student is at chum kiu level we modified the first exercise a bit and added a third type. The first exercise continues to work the same, being without guard, but at a somewhat shorter distance (in which we reach one shoulder advancing) and instead of launching two attacks the partner will launch a series of continuous attacks until we “solve” the situation.
The exercise we add consists of the Wing Chun duel against Wing Chun. This is the type of combat that is usually seen in all styles, but in our case is not a priority because certainly the goal of combat in the kwoon is not the combat itself but the acquisition of skills for self defense. Therefore, if we centered the combat in the duel in which both use their Wing Chun we would leave aside many techniques that we will find ourselves in front of any other type of aggressor. However, this second type of sparring is interesting and adds a new dimension, that of ego and pride. Here both the practitioners are actually facing and contrasting their abilities, whereas when one does free sparring for the other this is not so. Learning to control anger or vice versa, being able to generate aggressiveness, are key points for the good fighter.

Finally, let’s look at some important tips as to what we should not do when we fight with our Wing Chun:
-Avoid initiating the attack when we are not at a suitable distance, that means that on many occasions we will fight the counterattack. Although it is equally important not to miss the opportunity to attack.
-Avoid entering the game of long distance, ie avoid entering and exiting again automatically outside the striking distance. In Wing Chun we look for and wait for the moment to enter our distance, of which we do not want to leave again. Although it is equally important to recognize the moment when we need to do it to recover a correct position.
– Stay relaxed, monitor excessive body tension due to emotional pressure. Do not think about what you are going to do but respond to the opportunities that arise.

Combat, beating the hit, soft, medium or full contact has important benefits for the improvement of our Wing Chun. I hope in this article to have cleared doubts that some practitioners may have about it and have indicated a possible path to incorporate an effective combat practice.

Choose donation amount

Personal Info

Donation Total: 1.00€

General

La importancia de la práctica del combate en el Wing Chun Kuen


No Comments

Lo cierto es que muchos acabarían este título con un “es irrelevante”. Bajo mi punto de vista, incluir prácticas de combate en el entrenamiento de Wing Chun es muy interesante e imprescindible si queremos que lo que estamos practicando sea eficaz.

Veamos algunos de los argumentos que se dan en contra de su práctica:

El combate tipo duelo es irreal puesto que en una situación de defensa personal ésta se desarrolla de forma muy distinta a como lo hace en un ring.

Aunque no niego que sea cierto que el duelo no es del todo realista hay que admitir que el chi sao no lo es para nada y aún así es piedra angular en el Wing Chun. Por tanto que el combate no sea 100% realista no significa que no pueda ser útil.

-En la enseñanza tradicional no se entrenaba combate.

Esto no es cierto pues los practicantes de Wing Chun buscaban luchadores de otros estilos para realizar retos. El problema está en que hoy día si no se practica el combate en la clase muchos alumnos pueden pasar meses y años sin la oportunidad de practicarlo.

La práctica del chi sao y el entrenamiento de las técnicas es suficiente.

Ante un adversario que no ocupa la línea central por ejemplo el chi sao pierde gran parte de su utilidad. Y ante un adversario que va a defenderse y contraatacar, el entrenamiento programado de la técnica no es suficiente.

Por estos motivos creo que no se sostiene el argumento de que el combate no deba formar parte del entrenamiento del Wing Chun. Sus beneficios son múltiples, pues aunque un duelo no es exactamente igual que una situación real lo cierto es que en ésta podemos recibir el ataque desde una distancia larga, en un posición lateral, con el paso cambiado etc. Situaciones que se dan durante el combate. Así pues, sabiendo cuales son sus límites, incorporar su práctica nos va a resultar útil.

wing chun

Eso sí, debemos saber cómo entrenar el combate para que sea coherente con nuestro sistema. Aunque lo que sigue a continuación no es sino una propuesta personal, puede resultar interesante para muchos practicantes. Lo primero es tener en cuenta que la aproximación al combate debe ser progresiva. En mi escuela tras un mes de práctica, el primer paso consiste en responder desde una guardia estática a un ataque de cualquier tipo y aleatorio. A los tres meses incorporamos las combinaciones de dos ataques. A los cuatro o cinco meses mantenemos la espera estática y el estimulo de combinaciones de nuestro compañero pero ahora esperando sin guardia. El entrenamiento de respuesta sin guardia es importante en cuanto a la perspectiva de la defensa personal. Evidentemente ante una situación de peligro siempre debemos mantener la distancia y las manos arriba pero en ocasiones no hay aviso previo a la agresión. Aunque en estos casos responder se vuelve difícil, entrenar de esta manera mejora nuestras posibilidades de éxito. Simultáneamente, esto es a los cuatro o cinco meses, incorporamos propiamente el combate o sparring. En este caso uno de los dos practicantes va a utilizar su Wing Chun mientras que el compañero va a utilizar cualquier tipo de técnica, sea o no sea de nuestro estilo. De hecho enfatizamos el uso de la línea circular puesto que en otros estilos suele usarse tanto o más que la línea recta. Durante el sparring es interesante también que el compañero intente luchar desde una distancia mayor a la que queremos en Wing Chun y que cambie la posición respecto a nosotros de manera que nos veamos obligados a trabajar la movilidad. También es importante que no sea colaborativo con nosotros (estamos hablando de combate) pero que tampoco se exceda si es superior técnicamente de manera que podamos ir mejorando progresivamente.

En mi escuela cuando el alumno está en nivel de chum kiu modificamos un poco el primer ejercicio y añadimos un tercer tipo. El primer ejercicio se sigue trabajando igual, estando sin guardia, pero a una distancia algo menor (en la que nos alcancen avanzando un hombro) y en vez de lanzar dos ataques el compañero nos lanzará una serie de ataques continuos hasta que “resolvamos” la situación.

El ejercicio que añadimos consiste en el duelo de Wing Chun contra Wing Chun. Este es el tipo de combate que suele verse en todos los estilos, pero en nuestro caso no es prioritario pues ciertamente el objetivo del combate en el kwoon no es el combate en sí mismo sino la adquisición de aptitudes para la defensa personal. Por ello, si centráramos el combate en el duelo en el que ambos trabajan su Wing Chun dejaríamos de lado muchas técnicas que vamos a encontrarnos ante cualquier otro tipo de agresor. Sin embargo, este segundo tipo de duelo es interesante y añade una dimensión nueva, la del ego y el orgullo. Pues aquí realmente ambos practicantes se están enfrentando y contrastando sus habilidades, mientras que cuando uno hace de sparring libre para el otro esto no es así. Aprender a controlar la ira o bien al revés, ser capaz de generar agresividad, son puntos claves para el buen luchador.

Por último veamos algunos consejos importantes, en cuanto a lo que no debemos hacer cuando combatimos con nuestro Wing Chun:

-Evitar iniciar el ataque cuando no estamos a una distancia adecuada, eso significa que en muchas ocasiones lucharemos al contraataque. Aunque es igual de importante no dejar pasar la oportunidad de atacar.

-Evitar entrar en el juego de la distancia larga, es decir evitar entrar y salir de nuevo automáticamente fuera de la distancia de golpeo. En Wing Chun buscamos y esperamos el momento de entrar a nuestra distancia, de la cual no queremos volver a salir. Aunque es igual de importante reconocer el momento en el que necesitamos hacerlo para recuperar una correcta posición.

-Mantenerse relajados, vigilar la tensión excesiva del cuerpo debida a presión emocional. No pensar en lo que vamos a hacer sino responder a las oportunidades que se presentan.

El combate, sea marcando el golpe, a contacto suave, medio o pleno tiene importantes beneficios para la mejora de nuestro Wing Chun. Espero en este artículo haber despejado dudas que algunos practicantes puedan tener al respecto y haber indicado un posible camino para incorporar una practica eficaz del combate.

Escoge la cantidad donada

Personal Info

Donation Total: 1.00€

filosofía

Sifu, or the invisible commitment


No Comments

The term sifu, which is traditionally referred to as the teacher or kungfu teacher, can be roughly translated as “father of practice”. Likewise, all the terminology used to refer to the classmates, students, teacher of the teacher himself, derives from that used to designate the members of the family. As we have already seen, Confucianism articulates the social environment in which Wing Chun is learned and practiced, and for Confucianism, the family is the nucleus and model from which all other social relations are built in traditional Chinese society .

These relations, according to Confucianism, revolve around the orders of hierarchy and the duty of obedience to your superior. Although it is true that Confucius defended that for obedience to be forced the superior should act correctly. As he expressed: “fu fu, zi zi”, that is to say when the father acts as father, the son acts as a son. But the truth is that in practice these relationships often do not work as much as a consequence of the superior’s doing well (whether father, politician, boss, martial arts teacher) or social pressure that allows even despotic positions from the upper step towards The lower one without it being able to do anything to remedy the situation.

My affinity for daoism and my rejection of much of Confucian ideology is clear. That is why my way of understanding someone’s sifu role may be something different. In fact when I started teaching I had serious doubts about promoting or encouraging my students to call me sifu. However, one day I realized that the moment someone sincerely considers your sifu to create a bond, an invisible commitment. I dare to think that in the great majority of cases the instructors understand that the link has been created from the student to the teacher: he must take it as a reference, respect him and even obey him. I do not insinuate that I do not claim respect for myself from my students, but as the claim to any other person with whom I relate. What happens is that in my view the duty, the obligation, the bond, is created from me to my student. When someone calls me sifu, and although he is not conscious, in my interior I sign a contract with myself. That person, who pays his fee every month, is waiting for me not only to do my work with total dedication, with absolute dedication to his improvement as a martial artist, but also as a transmitter of a wealth that goes beyond physical technique. I live the Wing Chun 24 hours a day, for me (although it sounds like topic) Wing Chun is not only practiced, it ends up living. Progress in the system as you progress as an individual, as a person. And when someone refers to me as sifu is obliging me, since I freely agree to be considered as such, to be your guide and companion in that process, last the time that lasts. My position before him is not superior, on the contrary, in our relationship he is the first.

As the Daodejing says: the wise man is placed last, and the same we can say of the good sifu.

Choose donation amount

Personal Info

Donation Total: 1.00€

sifu ip man

 

filosofía

Sifu, o el compromiso invisible.


No Comments

El término sifu, con el que se designa tradicionalmente al profesor o maestro de kungfu, puede traducirse aproximadamente como “padre de práctica”. Igualmente toda la terminología utilizada para referirse a los compañeros, alumnos, maestro del propio maestro, deriva de aquella utiliza para designar a los miembros de la familia. Y es que como ya vimos, el confucionismo articula el entorno social en que se aprende y practica el Wing Chun y para el confucianismo la familia es el núcleo y modelo a partir del cual se construye todo el resto de relaciones sociales en la sociedad china tradicional.

Estas relaciones, según el confucianismo, giran en torno a los órdenes de jerarquía y al deber de obediencia a tu superior. Aunque es cierto que Confucio defendía que para que la obediencia fuera obligada el superior debía actuar correctamente. Tal como expresaba: “ fu fu, zi zi”, es decir cuando el padre hace de padre, el hijo hace de hijo. Pero lo cierto es que en la práctica en muchas ocasiones estas relaciones no funcionan tanto como consecuencia del buen hacer del superior (sea padre, político, jefe, maestro de artes marciales) sino por la presión social que permite incluso posiciones despóticas del escalón superior hacia el inferior sin que éste pueda hacer nada para remediar la situación.

Queda clara mi afinidad por el daoismo y mi rechazo de gran parte de la ideología confuciana. Es por esto que mi manera de entender el rol de ser sifu de alguien puede ser algo diferente. De hecho cuando empecé a impartir clases tuve serias dudas de promover o animar a mis alumnos a denominarme sifu. Sin embargo, un día comprendí que en el momento en que alguien te considera, sinceramente, su sifu se crea un vínculo, un compromiso invisible. Me atrevo a pensar que en la gran mayoría de casos los instructores entienden que el vínculo se ha creado del alumno hacia el maestro: deberá tomarlo como referencia, respetarle y hasta obedecerlo. No insinúo que no reclame respeto hacia mi por parte de mis alumnos, pero como la reclamo a cualquier otra persona con la que me relaciono. Lo que sucede es que bajo mi punto de vista el deber, la obligación, el vínculo, se crea de mi hacia mi alumno. Cuando alguien me llama sifu, y aunque él no sea consciente, en mi interior firmo un contrato conmigo mismo. Esa persona, que paga su cuota cada mes, está esperando de mi no solamente que haga mi trabajo con entrega total, con dedicación absoluta a su mejora como artista marcial, sino también como transmisor de una riqueza que va más allá de la técnica física. Yo vivo el Wing Chun 24 horas al día, para mi (aunque suene a tópico) el Wing Chun no solamente se practica, se acaba viviendo. Progresas en el sistema a la vez que progresas como individuo, como persona. Y cuando alguien se refiere a mi como sifu me está obligando, puesto que yo acepto libremente ser considerado como tal, a ser su guía y compañero en ese proceso, dure el tiempo que dure. Mi posición ante él no es de superioridad, al contrario, en nuestra relación él está el primero.

Tal como dice el Daodejing: el hombre sabio se coloca en último lugar, y lo mismo podemos decir del buen sifu.

Escoge la cantidad donada

Personal Info

Donation Total: 1.00€

sifu ip man

chi sao

The importance of stepping in chi sao


No Comments

It is possible to say that there are two great tendencies in the practice of chi sao: one in which the focus is mainly on the use of the hands and is developed mainly static, and one in which the use of the displacements.
Although training chi is without displacements, or almost without them, can be useful in an initial phase of the learning, the fact is that to maintain this modality as main carries important dangers in being effective in the combat. In fact, once the steps in the chi are mastered, all (or practically all) techniques should be done with displacement.

The initial distance between practitioners during chi is a distance too long for a stroke thrown from it to be effective. For a blow to produce the shock necessary to achieve a k.o. it must produce a jolt, going through the opponent’s body. It is for that reason that to hit at a realistic distance in which, if we wished, we could cause real damage to the adversary we must advance towards him. So to strike correctly from the starting point we must take a step with the attack.
On the other hand when defending the attack of the adversary, although sometimes we can stop the adversary without going back, the truth is that if we get used to using only our arms as a defensive tool we run several dangers. On the one hand we use only one defensive resource, while if the defense is accompanied by a displacement and our hands fail we will have more possibilities to avoid the attack of the adversary. On the other hand and although we do not fail, if the opponent launches an attack with a large displacement, even if we avoid the blow with the use of the hands without moving, it is possible that we stay so close to the body of the attacker that our own movements are hampered by lack of space. Obviously the opposite error that we must avoid is to move too far and leave the minimum distance of chi sao, moving away more than necessary.
Finally the use of steps in chi sao, both to attack and to defend, allows us to work the angles. We always strive to ensure that our anatomical center line (the one that divides the body into two symmetrical halves) coincides with the real central line (the plane that joins our spine with that of the adversary), and that is not so for our adversary. This gives us an advantage over it, and can not be achieved without working the techniques with steps in the chi sao. Equally learning to avoid being dominated in the central line is also something that we achieve by training the chi with steps.

In short: training chi sao techniques without movement can be an appropriate initial (although not necessary) phase for the beginner. Training chi sao with great use of steps gives us a more useful practice to develop effective skills in real combat.

Choose donation amount

Personal Info

Donation Total: 1.00€

*Video is in spanish